March 22, 2022
|By :
Nalin Kashyap

3C model of storytelling

Table of Contents

    Stories fly us around on the wings of words. We travel to new lands, to new places. We laugh, we cry. There is a unique bond that is built by stories. This is the power of storytelling.

    Storytelling is licensed and channelized daydreaming because that's what you're doing. You're daydreaming and imagining the whole story. It is channelized because there is a specific story that you're dreaming about, and it is licensed because you're allowed to listen.

    There is a 3C's model for compelling storytelling:

    Character - There are very few stories that can be recited without having a character in them. You think of any great film; things get spiced up when there's an interesting character in it. From Tom and Jerry to Silencer in 3 idiots. Characters are the heart and soul of the story.

    These characters are divided into different genres altogether.

    • Protagonist - The protagonist is the central character of the story. Everything revolves around that very individual. They might not have any hero, but they should have an emotional connection with the audience.
    • Antagonist - Standing between the happiness and goals of our protagonist is our very own antagonist or what people generally refer to as 'The villain' of the story. The antagonist can be a place, situation, or medical condition.
    • Supporting characters: These are not the main actors in the story but support either the protagonist or the antagonist in their goals.

    Conflict - This is something that builds tension and induces surprises for the audience. There won't be any compelling story without an actual conflict.

    For e.g, let's take the example of Lagaan. Things change when an English officer announces the 'Teen guna' tax, compelling the villagers to play a game they have never played before. This conflict is what engages the audience.

    Conflict is what creates drama and entices the audience to wait till the end.

    Conclusion - When the conflict ends, we conclude. The final six from Bhuvan in the movie "Lagaan" was the conclusion of the story Lagaan. Either the character fights out the conflict, or it gets defeated by it. The conclusion should justify the emotions of the audience. When the audience gets disappointed with the conclusion, the story in total goes in vain. Dear storyteller, please keep that in mind - A great story ends with a good ending.

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